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  1. #1
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    Think your synth oil is really synth?

    Found it on NS.com posted by "elfenstar"

    real good info.

    http://motorcycleinfo.calsci.com/Oils1.htm

    "Your piston rings do not do a perfect job of sealing. Some combustion by products will slip past the rings into the engine. This can be little particles of carbon. Remember, diamond is carbon that was combined under heat and pressure. These little carbon particles can be quite damaging to your engine. Another job of your oil is to hold these particles in suspension until the oil filter can grab them...


    In 1959, Chevron developed a new method of refining base oils called Hydrocracking, where you process the raw oil at high temperatures and pressures with hydrogen and various catalysts. In Hydrocracking, many of the paraffin and wax molecules are broken up into mineral oil molecules, which increases the performance of the base oil dramatically. Also, far more of the aromatics and sulpher and nitrogen compounds are removed from the oil.

    Since 1990, Chevron's process has been improved. In 1993, Chevron invented the Hydro-Isomerization process, where wax and paraffin molecules are reshaped into useful lubricants instead of simply being broken up into smaller molecules. By increasing the severity of the hydrocracking process, increasing the temperature and pressure and processing time to process more and more of the unwanted wax and paraffin molecules, the oil's low and high temperature performance and resistance to oxidation can be improved to the point where the distinction between mineral oils and synthetics becomes blurred. Chevron now licenses this process, called Iso- DeWaxing. This process of oil refining is becoming more and more popular, and in 2004 accounts for almost half of all base oils. Iso- DeWaxing not only produces much higher-performance oil, but also allows you to start with lower quality crude oil, making us less dependent on the few countries that happen to produce the purest crude oils...

    Base oils made with the Iso-DeWaxing process are called Group II, and are significantly more pure and have higher performance than Group I base oils. Chevron Delo 400, Mobil Delvac 1300, and Shell Rotella are made from pure Group II oils. Motor oils made with Group-II base oils leave far fewer wax and tar deposits in your engine, and have much better low and high temperature performance than Group I oils. The resulting oils are roughly 97% good stuff (oil) and 3% bad stuff (paraffin and wax). We just cut that 12" dinner candle down to about 2?"...

    Group III oils have properties approaching or equaling synthetics, so long as the temperature is above about 40?. Group III based oils are often claimed to not perform as well as synthetics in a couple ways: their low temperature performance is not nearly as good, it is sometimes claimed on the basis of the "ball bearing test" that they offer lower impact resistance, and since their flash point is slightly lower it is claimed that they burn off more easily. However, most modern engines are water-cooled, so it's hard to see how the slightly better flash points of the synthetics ever come into play...

    In the late 1990s, Castrol started selling an oil made from Group III base oil and called it SynTec Full Synthetic. Mobil sued Castrol, asserting that this oil was not synthetic, but simply a highly refined petroleum oil, and therefore it was false advertising to call it synthetic. In 1999, Mobil lost their lawsuit. It was decided that the word "synthetic" was a marketing term and referred to properties, not to production methods or ingredients. Castrol continues to make SynTec out of Group III base oils, that is highly purified mineral oil with most all of the c*ckroach bits removed...

    Shortly after Mobil lost their lawsuit, most oil companies started reformulating their synthetic oils to use Group III base stocks instead of PAOs or diester stocks as their primary component. Most of the "synthetic oil" you can buy today is actually mostly made of this highly-distilled and purified dino-juice called Group III oil. Group III base oils cost about half as much as the synthetics. By using a blend of mostly Group III oils and a smaller amount of "true" synthetics, the oil companies can produce a product that has nearly the same properties as the "true" synthetics, and nearly the same cost as the Group III oil. The much more expensive traditional synthetics are now available in their pure forms only in more expensive and harder to obtain oils. To the best of my knowledge, Delvac-1, AMSOil, Redline, and Motul 5100 are the only oils made from pure traditional synthetics. .."


    link to the NS.com thread
    http://www.nissansilvia.com/forums/i...owtopic=128473
    Nissan GTR -09 Now with Cobb accessport stage 2

  2. #2
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    Seen a similar thing posted to promote Silkolene.

  3. #3
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    I don't think it matters that much if it's genuine synthetic or "fake".
    The fake ones are supposed to be good. But the genuine even better.

    It just bugs me that the oil companies market the "fake" ones as 100% synthetic
    I'll go for the Motul 300V. It's supposed to be genuine synthetic (and priced thereafter).

    I'll ask a reseller just in case.
    Nissan GTR -09 Now with Cobb accessport stage 2

  4. #4
    Ginuwine-S15 Guest
    im pretty sure motul is 100% synthetic, its one of the most expensive oils on the market..

    I actually used the REDLINE oils now which is a ad more expensive but it keeps the VCT down in the morning lol!!

  5. #5
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    I'd say Royal Purple have got to be up there for price. ?60 for 4 litres....

    I use Silkolene in the engine and Redline Shockproof in the gearbox and diff (lightweight in the gearbox, heavy in the diff).

  6. #6
    Brad Guest
    Ive seen an engine pulled down after 115,000 k's with Castrol RS as the oil of choice the thing was perfect. There was some scaring/burning in the cam seats but they where completely unharmed. No other damage or anything to report. Regular changes of the oil filter as well as the oil at 5000 k's are all thats needed - and a relatively good grade oil. The engine in question is the hardest driven s14a that I know too, boosted to 1bar from 12,000km's. No track work done though.

    Brad.

  7. #7
    S15R Guest
    I've used Redline oil and found that redline oil didnt last long enough, so far I've tried quiet a few brands and i'd say Castrol RS is the best for value

    PAR engineering said they tested the light weight shock proof, but found that it didntt protect as good
    and smooth doesnt mean better protection from wear

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